When the millennium changed, so did fashion. Everything changed from the most popular hair accessory to footwear in 1999 and 2000. Fashion designers managed to look back in time and create fashion from our past using modern fabrics, like denim.

The Y2K (i.e., the year 2000) bug didn’t end the world. If anything, it only caused a minor inconvenience. But now that the millennium has rolled over, here are some Y2K fashion trends that are returning.

Halter tops

HALTER TOPS are trending again, but with a twist: they are much more fitted and conservative than before. HALTER TOPS work best when paired with a fitted, high-waisted skirt or full pair of jeans. The halter top was all the rage in the 90s, and it isn’t going anywhere. Juicy Couture is still making halters but more modern and edgy versions.

Velour tracksuits

While today’s fashion trends tend to favor bright, bold, and bright colors, there are still a few fashion staples that have been around for decades. The velour tracksuit is one of them. The velour tracksuit, which was first introduced in the mid-1980s, made its return around the time of the new millennium. Since then, it has fallen in and out of style, appearing again on the catwalks in early 2018.

Cropped baby tees

The 2000s were a pretty dark decade. The recession, war in Iraq, Y2k, and the dot-com bubble bust aren’t things a lot of people associate with fashion. However, the 2000s are making a comeback, and fashion pieces from the 2000s, such as crop tops, are making a comeback. Yes, you read that right. Although crop tops have been trending on runways and in magazines for years now, they never really took off. They simply weren’t comfortable or flattering enough for the average woman, especially those of us who aren’t models. But a 2018 survey found that 68 percent of women prefer crop tops over any other type of top, and that number has only continued to grow since.

Low rise jeans

Low-rise jeans have been a favorite for decades. While skinny jeans are still popular, more and more women are seeking the low-rise style, and it’s no surprise why. The low-rise style offers more coverage and pairs perfectly with boots. This year, you can expect to find a number of jean options in all your favorite stores.

Bucket hats

The Bucket Hat trend was huge in the 2000s but has since fallen out of favor. As the Millennial generation grows older, there’s a growing demand for bringing back this trend. The Y2K meltdown did a number on the fashion and beauty world, and while most trends have fallen by the wayside, one, in particular, is making a comeback. Bucket hats have made their way to the catwalks, and with good reason: they are super comfortable, cool, and trendy.

Cardigans and pleated skirts

Fashion trends change often. Styles that were once trendy can quickly become outdated, and when that trend hits its peak, designers offer the next style in vogue, and boom! It’s out of style again. The Y2K fashion trends reappearance this year include pleated skirts and cardigans.

Ribbed lace-trimmed dress

No matter what you thought the last time you were wearing a Y2K survival outfit, it’s time to bring back those ribbed lace-trimmed dresses. Remember the trend? The ribbed lace-trimmed dress was all the rage in 2000 but has fallen from favor over the last 18 years, mostly due to the dated look. However, the trend is back in fashion. From spotted Ribbed lace-trimmed dresses in vintage floral and paisley prints to modern, clean, trendy stripes, these dresses make a stylish comeback.

Funky accessories

The year 2000 was marked by cataclysmic events—the dot.com boom, the wide-spread Y2K bug, and the second coming of grunge—but fashion trends also marked it. It was the year that taught us that funky accessories were cool, as well as the year that taught us that fluorescent colors were, positively, on fire. Some trends have thrived into the new millennium (like the scrunchie), while others have faded (like the matching socks set). Still, the Y2K fashion trends that made everyone in the 2000s frenzy are returning to today’s runways, DIY blogs, and in-the-streets style.